samswritingtips:

The basics of eye shapes for writers.

My sources are probably better than I am (more photos, longer descriptions), so here they are: [x] [x]

Guide: Timelines 

writing-questions-answered:


How It’s Said (substitutes)
In a happy way: laughed, rejoiced, giggled, joked, lilted, sang out.
In a sad way: cried, agonised, bawled, blubbered, lamented, sobbed, groaned, snivelled, wept, mourned.
In a bossy way: insisted, bossed, demanded, preached, dictated, professed, ordered.
In an angry way: raged, miffed, seethed, fumed, retorted, thundered, blurted.
In a pained way: barked, cried out, cried, screamed, jabbered, bellowed, groaned, howled, shrieked, roared, grieved, wailed, yelped.
In a frightened way: quaked, stammered, shuddered, quivered, trembled.
In an understanding way: empathised, accepted, consoled, crooned, comforted, sympathised, agreed.
In a tired way: mumbled, struggled, emitted, wearied.
In a begging way: beseeched, begged, implored, pleaded, entreated, appealed to.
In a mocking way: mocked, ridiculed, derided, hooted, japed, insulted, jeered, parodied, taunted, teased, chaffed, flouted, degraded, sneered, disdained, jibed, gibed, disparaged, belittled, decried, flouted, fleered, leered, scoffed, sniggered, swiped, scorned, repudiated, lampooned.
In a seductive way: purred, simpered, coaxed, wheedled, persuaded, baited.
As an answer: As an answer: responded, retorted, replied, rejoined, answered, acknowledged.
[Source] [[Jack Teagle]

How It’s Said (substitutes)

In a happy way: laughed, rejoiced, giggled, joked, lilted, sang out.

In a sad way: cried, agonised, bawled, blubbered, lamented, sobbed, groaned, snivelled, wept, mourned.

In a bossy way: insisted, bossed, demanded, preached, dictated, professed, ordered.

In an angry way: raged, miffed, seethed, fumed, retorted, thundered, blurted.

In a pained way: barked, cried out, cried, screamed, jabbered, bellowed, groaned, howled, shrieked, roared, grieved, wailed, yelped.

In a frightened way: quaked, stammered, shuddered, quivered, trembled.

In an understanding way: empathised, accepted, consoled, crooned, comforted, sympathised, agreed.

In a tired way: mumbled, struggled, emitted, wearied.

In a begging way: beseeched, begged, implored, pleaded, entreated, appealed to.

In a mocking way: mocked, ridiculed, derided, hooted, japed, insulted, jeered, parodied, taunted, teased, chaffed, flouted, degraded, sneered, disdained, jibed, gibed, disparaged, belittled, decried, flouted, fleered, leered, scoffed, sniggered, swiped, scorned, repudiated, lampooned.

In a seductive way: purred, simpered, coaxed, wheedled, persuaded, baited.

As an answer: As an answer: responded, retorted, replied, rejoined, answered, acknowledged.

[Source] [[Jack Teagle]

POSTED August 21, 2014 @ 14:02 WITH 23,784 notes
REBLOGGED FROM: thewritingcafe (SOURCE: victoriousvocabulary)
Anonymous ASKED:
What are the steps to designing a fictional disease?

characterandwritinghelp:

LET’S INFECT SOME PEOPLE.

Inside this post: Not so much a step-by-step, but a bulleted list of things to consider when creating a fictional disease, sickness, infection, illness, or ailment, as brought to you by someone who is not a doctor and knows very very little about actual, real medicine. Anyone with better information and more knowledge is absolutely free to correct and add to this post. -Headless

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Guide: Describing Clothing and Appearance 

writing-questions-answered:

When Describing a Character

DO:

  • provide enough detail to give the reader a sense of the character’s physical appearance
  • highlight details that serve as clues to who the character is and perhaps what their life is like
  • describe clothing to establish character or when relevant to scene

Guide: Describing Clothing and Appearance 

writing-questions-answered:

When Describing a Character

DO:

  • provide enough detail to give the reader a sense of the character’s physical appearance
  • highlight details that serve as clues to who the character is and perhaps what their life is like
  • describe clothing to establish character or when relevant to scene

clevergirlhelps:


writerhelp:

One thing I’ve always noticed is how some people find it amazingly difficult to write pregnant characters. A couple of months ago I wrote a full story about a pregnancy, and I did my research. So I might be able to help.
» Make sure you want to do this
Keep in mind that a pregnancy isn’t the easiest thing in the world. It takes doctor appointments, a lot of exhaustion, sickness and, most importantly, time. If you didn’t know, it takes about nine months for a baby to be born. That’s almost 275 days. That means that you should only go on if you really want to create a baby in your story, because you can’t skip too much time - it isn’t like the movies where in one scene the lady’s finding out she’s pregnant, and in the other, she’s already in labor.Here’s a tip: if you really want to make your characters happy and thrilled with the news of baby, but you can’t afford the time and sweat that it takes to cook one, you have from 21-23 weeks to write a miscarriage.
» Pre-Pregnancy
Let’s talk about the elephant in the room: the conception. Even if you don’t write any kind of smutty scenes, you should let the reader know when and where the pregnancy started.
Unprotected Sex: think about how you’re going to put this in your story. If your characters are usually responsible, they won’t simply forget wearing a condom. Think about what is going on: are they completely sane? Are they under the influence of alcohol? Are they high (which, I must say, wouldn’t exactly make your characters irresponsible - it would either get them too horny to care or even more responsible than they already are)? Or are your characters already drowned to each other in a way that they can’t think of anything else? Are they married and actually planned on having this baby? All of this will have an influence on how the pregnancy will flow, and how it will affect people around it.

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clevergirlhelps:

writerhelp:

One thing I’ve always noticed is how some people find it amazingly difficult to write pregnant characters. A couple of months ago I wrote a full story about a pregnancy, and I did my research. So I might be able to help.

» Make sure you want to do this

Keep in mind that a pregnancy isn’t the easiest thing in the world. It takes doctor appointments, a lot of exhaustion, sickness and, most importantly, time. If you didn’t know, it takes about nine months for a baby to be born. That’s almost 275 days. That means that you should only go on if you really want to create a baby in your story, because you can’t skip too much time - it isn’t like the movies where in one scene the lady’s finding out she’s pregnant, and in the other, she’s already in labor.
Here’s a tip: if you really want to make your characters happy and thrilled with the news of baby, but you can’t afford the time and sweat that it takes to cook one, you have from 21-23 weeks to write a miscarriage.

» Pre-Pregnancy

Let’s talk about the elephant in the room: the conception. Even if you don’t write any kind of smutty scenes, you should let the reader know when and where the pregnancy started.

Unprotected Sex: think about how you’re going to put this in your story. If your characters are usually responsible, they won’t simply forget wearing a condom. Think about what is going on: are they completely sane? Are they under the influence of alcohol? Are they high (which, I must say, wouldn’t exactly make your characters irresponsible - it would either get them too horny to care or even more responsible than they already are)? Or are your characters already drowned to each other in a way that they can’t think of anything else? Are they married and actually planned on having this baby? All of this will have an influence on how the pregnancy will flow, and how it will affect people around it.

Read More

disneyland24-7:

mydollyaviana:

Literary techniques explained by Disney - from Buzzfeed

This makes me very happy

realrandomsam:

smaugnussen:

goddessofsax:

Hair color reference chart. It’s not perfect, but from what I could gather it’s pretty accurate.

dont let the fanfic writers see this

You forgot titian.

POSTED July 21, 2014 @ 00:17 WITH 148,763 notes
REBLOGGED FROM: thewritingcafe (SOURCE: goddessofsax)

So maybe you’re a writer or maybe you’re in a fantasy RP group, maybe you just want to make maps. Either way, with the right guidance the process is pretty easy. Here’s some Photoshop and research resources I’ve compiled to make your life easier.

WORLD MAPSHow to generate a map in Photoshop (video)How to create (mountain) brushes (video)How to create trees (video)How to create mountains and hills (video)How to create swamps and deserts (video) Tolkien-Style Map Brushes (1)(2) Parchment Textures (1)(2)(3)Calthyechild’s Fantasy Map Tutorial & Resources World Maps to inspire you (1)(2)(3)(4) 
CITIESCity Map GeneratorClevergirlhelps’ Brilliant Post on City PlanningThewritingcafe’s Brilliant Post on City PlanningStreets VS MonumentsHow to create a grid in PhotoshopCity BrushesCities to inspire you (1)(2)(3)(4)MISC.Ship PlansHow Geography Affects ClimateHow Streets Evolve as Cities GrowHistory of Building MaterialsClimatesR. Steves’ Europe (Videos) NEED A NAME? Location and Setting name generatorPirate Ship name generatorShip name generator

So maybe you’re a writer or maybe you’re in a fantasy RP group, maybe you just want to make maps. Either way, with the right guidance the process is pretty easy. Here’s some Photoshop and research resources I’ve compiled to make your life easier.

WORLD MAPS
How to generate a map in Photoshop (video)
How to create (mountain) brushes 
(video)
How to create trees 
(video)
How to create mountains and hills 
(video)
How to create swamps and deserts 
(video)
Tolkien-Style Map Brushes (1)(2)
Parchment Textures (1)(2)(3)
Calthyechild’s Fantasy Map Tutorial & Resources
World Maps to inspire you (1)(2)(3)(4)